The new iPhone 7 will be a big deal for journalists

 This is the new dual-lens setup of the iPhone 7 Plus. Pictures provided by Apple Inc.

This is the new dual-lens setup of the iPhone 7 Plus. Pictures provided by Apple Inc.

Apple announced the new iPhone 7 yesterday. With its dual-lens setup and upgraded A10 Fusion chip, it will be a creative powerhouse for journalists in the field.

Yes, it has no headphone jack. Get over it.

Now that we have moved on, lets look at my favourite feature of the iPhone: its camera. And the iPhone 7’s camera is, obviously, going to be the best camera ever on an iPhone. 

You must have watched by now countless Facebook Live videos from various outlets. They, most of the time, fall in two categories: either jerky hand-shot video or static and boring, locked on a tripod, interviews. But here’s the good news: the small iPhone 7 will inherit the sensor-based image stabilisation from the iPhone 6s Plus. You should expect some smoother and more dynamic live videos on Facebook. 

The Plus version will have a dual lens setup. The new standard lens on it should help reporters when making portraits. The new tighter lens and fake bokeh, if they are done well by Apple, will contribute to delivering more high-end looking pictures. Plus, the new camera will have an “expanded colour gamut,” whatever that means for Apple. My hope is that it will help widen its dynamic range and keep in check those easy to burn highlights, especially with backlit scenes. Apple also says the new image processor included in the A10 Fusion system on a chip will help with noise reduction in low light.

There will still be a couple of niches where a full DSLR kit will be required, like sports photography or in extremely low light, but I think even professional photographers will start using more and more their smartphone cameras. They already do really. 

 The iPhone 7 Plus' second lens will be used as a 2X optical zoom in the camera app. Since the older camera feels like a 28mm, the new one should be around 50mm.

The iPhone 7 Plus' second lens will be used as a 2X optical zoom in the camera app. Since the older camera feels like a 28mm, the new one should be around 50mm.

We still have no new Macbook Pros, and the fact that Apple is selling a four-year-old design is a shame. Mobile apps still are not as versatile as full desktop apps, but they are getting darn closer every year. The new A10 Fusion SOC should help with that. It is a lot more potent than the already fast iPhone 6s A9 chip, and after seeing it running games in full 3D along with intricate particle effects i am confident in its video editing capabilities.

Being able to recover highlights and shadows with raw photo editing should also make many photographers happy. App developers will now have the ability to use capture raw picture files from the iPhone’s camera through an API. I do not think Apple will make the option available in its camera app; raw files use a lot more disk space and could quickly fill the iCloud Drive account of many unsuspecting customers, but I trust developers like Adobe, Google, and VSCO to get in there and tap into this new API. 

All in all, I cannot wait to see what reporters are going to produce with this new device. If you skipped the iPhone 6S, this is going to be a nice upgrade, especially in the new jet black colour. I truly am a fool for it.